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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

7 edition of Mathematical physiology; blood flow and electrically active cells found in the catalog.

Mathematical physiology; blood flow and electrically active cells

by H. Melvin Lieberstein

  • 142 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by American Elsevier Pub. Co. in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blood flow -- Measurement,
  • Blood flow -- Mathematical models,
  • Electrophysiology

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies.

    Statement[by] H. Melvin Lieberstein.
    SeriesModern analytic and computational methods in science and mathematics,, 40, Modern analytic and computational methods in science and mathematics ;, v. 40.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP101 .L52
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 377 p.
    Number of Pages377
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4919654M
    ISBN 100444001212
    LC Control Number76187684

    An introduction to membrane transport and bioelectricity: foundations of general physiology and electrochemical signaling. 2nd ed Format: Book. •The blood vessels constitute a barrier, inhibiting immature blood cells from leaving the bone marrow. •Only mature blood cells contain the membrane proteins required to attach to and pass the blood vessel endothelium. •Hematopoietic stem cells may also cross the bone-marrow barrier, and may thus be harvested from Size: 5MB.

    Blood volume: The sum of all blood cells and blood plasma volume. About 5 liters in an average person. Peripheral resistance: Friction between blood flow and blood vessel walls produces resistance that affect blood flow and blood pressure. Viscosity: Higher viscosity of blood (thicker blood) causes more. The book is organised in two parts: the first part treats blood flow and wall tension problems; the second discloses a mathematical formulation of electro-physiology, which serves as a unified description of the electrical activity of many varied electrically active cells of the body - nerve. skeletal muscle. smooth muscle. heart contraction.

    A description of the flow of blood cells in the capillary blood vessels is presented. The model employs the lubrication theory approach first suggested by Lighthill (J. Fluid Mech, –, ).The work of previous investigators is extended by taking into account a Cited by: 9. • Blood movement through the circulatory system • 1 circuit per minute at rest • 6 circuits per minute during activity • Fluid movement between blood capillaries and cells • Few cells are located more than 50 microns away from a capillary Guyton & Hall. Textbook of Medical Physiology, 11th Edition.


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Mathematical physiology; blood flow and electrically active cells by H. Melvin Lieberstein Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mathematical physiology; blood flow and electrically active cells. New York, American Elsevier Pub. [] (OCoLC) Online version: Lieberstein, H. Melvin. Mathematical physiology; blood flow and electrically active cells. New York, American Elsevier Pub. [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

Biophysics. (Book Reviews: Mathematical Physiology. Blood Flow and Electrically Active Cells). Mathematical physiology, with the consequent number of exercises given at the end of each chapter, could be used in particular for a full-year course in mathematical physiology.

It is also suitable for researchers and graduate students in applied mathematics, bioengineering and physiology.” (Fabien Crauste, Mathematical Reviews, Issue b)Cited by: Mathematical physiology, with the consequent number of exercises given at the end of each chapter, could be used in particular for a full-year course in mathematical physiology.

It is also suitable for researchers and graduate students in applied mathematics, bioengineering and physiology.” (Fabien Crauste, Mathematical Reviews, Issue b). There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology.

This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions.

Author(s): Lieberstein,H Melvin Title(s): Mathematical physiology: blood flow and electrically active cells/ H. Melvin Lieberstein. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: New York:.

Mathematical physiology. I: Cellular physiology. 2nd ed as can be seen by a quick look through any physiology book.

For example, in this book we discuss the role that Ca2+ plays in muscle. Mathematical physiology is an interdisciplinary ily, it investigates ways in which mathematics may be used to give insight into physiological questions.

In turn, it also describes how physiological questions can lead to new mathematical problems. Mathematical Physiology provides an introduction into physiology using the tools and perspectives of mathematical modeling and analysis. It describes ways in which mathematical theory may be used to give insights into physiological questions and how physiological questions can in turn lead to new mathematical book is divided in two parts, the first dealing with the fundamental Reviews: 2.

Communicating Applied Mathematics: Four Examples The Interaction of Steady State and Hopf Bifurcations in a Two-Predator–One-Prey Competition ModelCited by: An Introduction to Mathematical Physiology S.J.

Chapman, A.C. Fowler & R. Hinch Mathematical Institute, Oxford University January 6, File Size: 1MB. The purpose of this book is to study mathematical models of human physiology.

The book is a result of work by Math- Tech (in Copenhagen, Denmark) and the BioMath group at the Department of. They function to phagocytize and destroy damaged red blood cells, mostly in the liver and spleen explain the breakdown of Hemoglobin When liberated from red blood cells, they break down into their four component polpeptde globin chains, each surrounding a heme group, This further breaks down into iron and a greenish pigment called biliverdin.

Mathematical Physiology: Blood Flow and Electrically Active Cells (H. Melvin Lieberstein) On the Ultimate Boundedness of Moments Associated with Solutions of Stochastic Differential EquationsCited by: 4. Learn anatomy and physiology test 2 blood cells with free interactive flashcards.

Choose from different sets of anatomy and physiology test 2 blood cells flashcards on Quizlet. Blood is a body fluid in humans and other animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells.

In vertebrates, it is composed of blood cells suspended in bloodwhich constitutes 55% of blood fluid, is mostly water (92% by volume), and contains proteins, glucose, mineral ions FMA: Text book of medical physiology(N Geetha) Physiology of blood Red Blood Cells (Erythrocytes) rythrocytes: are the most abundant cells of the blood and are necessary for the delivery of oxygen to the tissues.

The major function of red blood cells, also known asFile Size: KB. Although its ubiquity in the human body may make it seem unremarkable, simply put, blood makes life possible. It nourishes cells throughout the body and transports carbon dioxide to the lungs.

Without it, the body would be unable to fight disease and infection or function at all. Readers are invited to follow the course of this extraordinary fluid as it circulates through the body and learn. surface) + severalproteins bound to the endothelial cells. 2) Blood flow – continual flow – without an accumulation of clotting factors.

3) The antithrombin action of thrombin and fibrin; negative feed-back-thrombin becomes adsorbed to the prothrombin and fibrin acts as Size: KB. References to areas in biophysics (for example ion transport across real and synthetic membranes), cell biology (growth, function and form) and the nervous system are not included here; a more comprehensive bibliography would, of course, need to include these areas.

The bibliography does not contain references to scientific : George W. Swan. MATHEMATICAL PHYSIOLOGY – Hemodynamics in Humans: Physiology and Mathematical models – Jerry J. Batzel, Mostafa Bachar, Franz Kappel, Viraj Bhalani, Jochen G. Raimann and Peter Kotanko ©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) • Mean capillary pressure which is the mean pressure at the level of the capillaries.accuracy and reproducibility, a fact that makes them ideal for mathematical inves­ tigation.

Thus, it is in the study of electrically excitable cells that mathematics and physiology have traditionally had their closest links.

The opening chapter of this volume provides an introduction to the mathe­ matics of electrically excitable cells.CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY • CELL ORGANELLS. • Digests connective tissue, allowing cells to migrate • Very active in cancer cells, allowing metastasis.

IRREVERSIBLE CELLULAR DEATH • NUCLEAR DAMAGE • LYSOSOMAL DAMAGE • MITOCHONDRIAL .